4 September 2012

INTERVIEW: ANNA VIRNICH

On a hot summer day the artist Anna Virnich welcomes me on the balcony of her Neukölln apartment with an euphoric smile and a pot of exquisite cucumber-mint-citrus sparkling water. Her flat‘s walls are covered with artworks by her friends and mentors, beautiful flowers decorate the tables.
Anna has a distinctive eye for aesthetics and colours - her inspiration often crosses the usual borders of contemporary art: fashion magazines, lyrics, discussions, smells - Anna crystallises the essence of countless key moments into her photography and her three-dimensional fabric-works. She specifically takes a shine to beauty products, so that her upcoming solo exhibition at DREI in Cologne bears the title ,Ruby Woo‘ - inspired by a matte red lipstick by MAC.
I cannot really decide what makes Anna so likeable: The fact that she cries, when she sells a work of art or that that she considered Kurt Cobain her uncle when she was a child. 

IMG_1944IMG_1983
IMG_1930IMG_1931IMG_1953Bild2_AFeiflerfeldundwiesen Anna Virnich derpfauIMG_1936IMG_1999_MG_0094AF _DSC3604-19IMG_2019IMG_2023IMG_2024schneestuhlBild1_AF Galerie_Drei_Farewell_Anna Virnich IMG_0698Anna Virnich O.T_40x60 IMG_2054
(translated English version, original German version below)

Anna-Lena: Anna, you graduated in the city of Braunschweig, you live in Berlin and now your work will be exhibited in Düsseldorf and Cologne. Where do you feel home?
Anna: I was born in Berlin and I spend the first years of my life there. In 1990 we moved to Cologne and that‘s where I grew up. So, both of these cities have an equal place in my heart.

Anna-Lena: Did you know that you want to become an artist right after finishing school?
Anna: It was the opposite: At first, I didn‘t wanted to become an artist at all. There are already so many of them in my family and their surroundings - it felt like an occupied zone to me.
My passion for movies made me do a bunch of different jobs in the film business, such as screen writing, stills photography, supervising extras and at the same time I assisted the photographer Thekla Ehling. However, one day - I was 22 - I had to admit to myself that I really want to do art - to create my own things. And then it all started.

Anna-Lena: Was it a hard task to suddenly work all on your own?
Anna: Yes, in my first semester I raised several doubts. But it rapidly felt like I took the right decision.

Anna-Lena: Did you ever experience creative blockades?
Anna: Absolutely. In the beginning I often asked myself: Who am I confronting? At first I had to process all the influences of my youth, quitting to look at art for one and a half years. I simply wanted to get rid of all these impressions, in order to have a fresh start.

Anna-Lena: You just received your diploma as one of Walter Dahn‘s master students and now you are preparing three exhibitions, out of which „Ruby Woo“ is a solo show. Are you able to cope with so much pressure?
Anna: Yes. When I am under a pressure of time, I demand precise outcomes from myself.
I do like stress. But on the contrary, I love those quiet and peaceful times that I spend in my studio just as much - they are the most important periods for my work.

Anna-Lena: I think your photos and fabric-works reflect that - they seem completely calm, rather than stressed.
Anna: The stress is an exterior thing. In my studio I really try to stay calm, focussing on the core that should crystallise in my work. Everything around me is pure chaos - the floor is covered with rags, fabrics and staples. I quickly loose the image that I arranged in the beginning of the working process. The piece somehow gets ahead of me, and then I am just dragging and pushing, cutting and placing, until I reach the point when I can let the work go.

Anna-Lena: Does it always work like that for you?
Anna: Well, since I get to know my material better and better, I have a much clearer imagination of the result. Then I simply know: I instantly need a coloured linen rag.

Anna-Lena: You started to work exclusively with photography - why did you suddenly develop such an interest in fabrics?
Anna: Fabric has always been an important material for me. My uncle studied fashion design and his place was packed with Vogues, fashion drawings and fabrics. Combined with my dad‘s world of colours, that I got to know through his paintings, I developed a fascination. My first three-dimensional works were all about light, colour and spatiality. 
One day I discovered an old wooden stretcher-frame and loosely attached paper to it. Thus, there was always a little movement, but the paper‘s colour faded from the sunlight. By the end of the second semester Walter Dahn asked me: „Anna, what about fabrics?“

Anna-Lena: Was it that obvious?
Anna: Yes, but I also just trusted him. My studio was covered with fashion magazine clippings that I used as colour tests. And when I went looking for fabrics for the first time, I was completely amazed: For example silk or chiffon - what happens when you layer them. It was like a door to a new world. Even my photography got more spatial since I started with the fabric-works.

Anna-Lena: Do you really call your fabric-works ,fabric-paintings‘ or did somebody else call it that?
Anna: It is always other people, who call it that way. Somehow, my work is constantly implicated in the realm of painting - even my photography was described as ,painterly‘. That made me think, if I might try all sorts of materials, only to avoid painting. But now I can negate those doubts. I simply like the haptic aspect of my fabric-works - it is like pores or skin; like surfaces that I explore.

Anna-Lena: Funnily, since you just told me about your first career in the film business, I never saw your photography as painterly, but rather as scenic. A bit like in one of those melancholic Scandinavian dramas.
Anna: I think its great that you see them that way. I feel the same. For me the photos are places, interiors or even frozen film-stills. Such as a story, where you only get one sentence: you don‘t know what happens before or after, but its clear that before and after exist. 

Anna-Lena: That makes me think of your photograph with the snowy chair, that you exhibited 2010 in the exhibition “every so often“ at DREI in Cologne. As in most of your other pictures, there are no people. Why is that?
Anna: When I started taking pictures, especially when I discovered Nan Goldin, there were many people in my photos. However, it was only friends that I photographed. At one point the faces started turning away, so that, for example, only the neck was revealed. And now there are hardly any people in the photos. But I cannot really explain how that happened. Some pictures, for instance „Eifler Feld und Wiesen“, open the space for the viewers‘ stories instead. I am happy when the images can enable individual desires, longings or nostalgia. 

Anna-Lena: This is one of your few works that doesn‘t carry an English, but a German title. How do your titles come into existence, such as from the installation ,Farewell‘, which reminds a bit of a laundry rack?
Anna: The title ,Farewell‘ emerged from the song ,Farewell Transmission‘ by Songs:Ohia. I listen to that particular song day and night and it just fitted so perfectly to the installation with the hanging rags, which didn‘t have a title at that point. I often have bits and pieces of songtexts in my mind, for instance by Patti Smith. But I think I am a bit crazy when it comes to her anyway, because my mum is the biggest fan and we always had a picture of her on the wall. Thats why I thought Patti Smith was a part of our family, when I was a child. But I also thought that Kurt Cubain was my uncle.

Anna-Lena: If lyrics play such an important role in your working process, what kind of music do you listen to at the moment?
Anna: Oh, that‘s a pretty wild mix of old Hip Hop, like Mobb Deep or Wu Tang Clan. I listen to lots of timeless classics, such as Bob Dylan, Neil Young, PJ Harvey and so on. Well produced Pop-Music and Techno, especially DJ Koze are also on my playlist. I also love Bach and Chopin.

Anna-Lena: Where is your favourite spot in Berlin?
Anna: Depending on the seasons, my favourite spot changes. On warm summer nights I love to be at Oranienstrasse in Kreuzberg.


Interview & Photos: Anna-Lena Werner
Photos of  Anna Virnich's artworks: Courtesy & Copyright Anna Virnich 

On the weekend of Düsseldorf Cologne Open Galleries (DCOpen), from 6th to 9th September 2012, Anna Virnich‘s artworks will be represented in three exhibitions:

,RUBY WOO‘ 
Anna Virnich
OPENING: FRI, 7/9/12, 18H
until 20. October 2012

DREI
Albertusstr. 3
D-50667 Cologne

-------------------------------------------------------------

,CURIOSITY‘
Anna Virnich & Özlem Sakalsiz
OPENING & PARTY: FRI, 7. September, 24h
until 8. November 2012

Salon Schmitz 
Aachener Str. 128
50670 Cologne

-------------------------------------------------------------

,KÖPPELS & PÜRLATIONS‘ 
Artists of gallery DREI & Guests
OPENING: Thursday, 6. September, 19h
until 21. October 2012

Sammlung Philara (UG) 
Walzwerkstr. 14
D-40599 Düsseldorf

 (Original interview in German language)


An einem heißen Sommertag werde ich von der Künstlerin Anna Virnich mit einem euphorischem Lächeln und exquisitem Gurken-Minze-Zitronen Sprudelwasser auf dem Balkon ihrer hellen Neuköllner Wohnung empfangen. An den Wänden in der Wohnung hängen viele Arbeiten von Freunden und Mentoren, die Tische sind voller schöner Schnittblumen.
Annas offener Blick für Ästhetik und Farben geht weit über die gewöhnlichen Grenzen der zeitgenössischen Kunst hinaus: Modemagazine, Song-Texte, Kochbücher, Gespräche, Gerüche - die Essenz unzähliger Schlüsselmomente schält Anna wie einen Kern in ihrer Fotografie und ihren plastischen Stoffarbeiten heraus. Ganz besonders Beauty Produkte haben es ihr angetan und so brachte es der matt rote Lippenstift ,Ruby Woo‘ von MAC sogar zum Titel ihrer kommenden Kölner Einzelausstellung bei DREI.
Ich kann mich bis jetzt nicht entscheiden, was ich an Anna Virnich sympathischer finde: Die Tatsache, dass sie weint, wenn sie eine Arbeit verkauft oder, dass sie Kurt Cobain als Kind für ihren Onkel hielt.

Anna-Lena: Du hast in Braunschweig studiert - lebst in Berlin und bist jetzt im Rheinland in mehreren Ausstellungen vertreten. Wo ist Deine Heimat?
Anna: Ich bin in Berlin geboren und habe die ersten Jahre in Kreuzberg gelebt. 1990 sind wir dann nach Köln umgezogen und da bin ich groß geworden. Ich habe also wirklich beide Städte in meinem Herzen.

Anna-Lena: Wusstest Du direkt nach der Schule, dass Du Künstlerin werden möchtest?
Anna: Im Gegenteil: Ich wollte nie Künstlerin werden, weil meine Familie und deren Freundeskreis bereits voller Künstler ist. Es fühlte sich wie ein besetztes Feld an. Meine Leidenschaft zum Film hat mich dann zu Kinoproduktionen gebracht, wo ich alles mögliche gemacht habe: Drehbuchbearbeitung, Standfotografie, Komparsenbetreuung und so weiter. Parallel habe ich bei der Kölner Fotografin Thekla Ehling assistiert. Aber irgendwann, da war ich 22, musste ich mir eingestehen, dass ich Kunst machen will - meine eigenen Sachen produzieren möchte. Und dann ging es los.

Anna-Lena: War das eine komische Umstellung für Dich plötzlich ganz alleine zu arbeiten?
Anna: In meinem ersten Semester kamen schon auch Zweifel bei mir auf. Aber eigentlich fühlte sich die Entscheidung sehr schnell genau richtig an.

Anna-Lena: Musstest Du dich mit Blockaden auseinandersetzen?
Anna: Auf jeden Fall. Am Anfang meines Studiums hab ich mich gefragt: Wem stelle ich mich? Ich musste erstmal die anspruchsvollen Einflüsse und Eindrücke aus meiner Jugend abarbeiten. Deswegen habe ich erstmal komplett aufgehört mir Kunst anzugucken. Bestimmt für eineinhalb Jahre. Ich wollte alles von mir wegschieben, mir Scheuklappen aufsetzen, um mit der Kunst neu zu beginnen. 

Anna-Lena: Gerade erst hast du dein Diplom beendet, bist Meisterschülerin von Walter Dahn und jetzt stehen schon drei Ausstellungen an, inklusive der Einzelausstellung „Ruby Woo“. Arbeitest Du gut unter so viel Druck?
Anna: Ja. Unter Zeitdruck verlange ich von mir selbst Konkretes. Auch Stress mag ich gerne. Aber im Gegenzug liebe ich auch die Leerläufe ohne Fixpunkt, die ich im Atelier verbringen kann - die sind am wichtigsten für meine Arbeit.

Anna-Lena: Das schlägt sich auch in Deinen Fotos und Stoffarbeiten nieder, denn da spürt man kaum Stress. Ich finde sie strahlen totale Ruhe aus.
Anna: Der Stress kommt auch vielmehr von Außen. Im Atelier versuche ich wirklich ruhig zu sein. Da geht es mir um den Kern, den ich in meinen Arbeiten herausschälen möchte. Um mich herum ist dann alles total chaotisch - der Boden ist bedeckt von Stofffetzen und Tackernadeln. Ich verliere auch schnell das Bild, dass ich am Anfang von einer Arbeit festlege. Die Arbeit überholt mich, und dann ist es ein einziges Gezurre und Gezerre, Schneiden und Zusammenlegen, bis ich an den Punkt komme, wo ich die Arbeit gehen lassen kann.

Anna-Lena: Ist das immer so?
Anna: Da ich mein Material immer besser kennenlerne, habe ich auch immer klarere Vorstellungen von dem Ergebnis. Dann weiß ich zum Beispiel genau: Jetzt brauche ich ein durchgefärbtes Leinenstück.

Anna-Lena: Wie entstand der Wechsel von Deinem Fotografie-Schwerpunkt hin zu den Stoffarbeiten?
Anna: Stoff war immer ein wichtiges Material für mich. Mein Onkel hat Modedesign studiert und bei ihm Zuhause war alles voller Vogues, Modezeichnungen und Stoffresten. Das - gepaart mit der Farbwelt, die ich durch die Malerei meines Vaters kennenlernte - hat mich immer begleitet. Bei den ersten plastischen Arbeiten ging es mir nur um Licht, Farbe und Räumlichkeit. Irgendwann habe ich einen alten Keilrahmen entdeckt und mit Papier bezogen. Es war nicht überall befestigt - dadurch gab es immer eine leichte Bewegung - und es blich schnell von der Sonne aus. Gegen Ende des zweiten Semesters fragte mich dann Walter Dahn: „Anna, was ist denn mit Stoff?“

Anna-Lena: Lag das direkt auf der Hand?
Anna: Ja, aber ich habe ihm auch einfach vertraut. In meinem Atelier war alles voller Ausschnitte aus Modemagazinen, weil ich sie als Farbproben benutze. Und als ich mich dann zum ersten Mal auf die Suche nach Stoffen gemacht habe, war ich völlig fasziniert: Zum Beispiel Seide, Chiffon, und was passiert, wenn man sie aufeinander legt. Es war eine Tür zu einer neuen Welt. Selbst meine Fotos sind durch die plastischen Stoffarbeiten räumlicher geworden.

Anna-Lena: Nennst Du die Stoffarbeiten wirklich ,Stoffmalerei‘, oder hat das jemand anderes so betitelt?
Anna: Es sind immer andere Leute, die es so nennen. Irgendwie werde ich immer in den Kontext der Malerei gesetzt - selbst meine Fotos werden als ,malerisch‘ bezeichnet. Das hat mich auch zum Nachdenken gebracht, ob ich womöglich alles probiere, nur um nicht zu malen. Aber das kann ich heute verneinen. Ich mag einfach das Haptische an den Arbeiten - dass sie wie Poren oder wie Haut sind;  wie Oberflächen, die ich untersuche.

Anna-Lena: Es mag vielleicht an Deiner frühen und kurzen Filmkarriere liegen - denn ich habe Deine Fotoarbeiten weniger im malerischen, sondern immer eher im Kontext des szenischen gesehen. Wie in so einem melancholisch skandinavischem Drama.
Anna: Ich finde das toll, dass du das so siehst. Mir geht es genauso. Für mich sind die Fotos wie Orte, Interieurs oder eingefrorene Filmstills. Wie eine Geschichte, aus der man nur einen Satz herauskriegt - du weißt nicht, was davor oder danach passiert, aber es ist sicher, dass ein Davor und ein Danach existiert.

Anna-Lena: Ich muss dabei besonders an Deine Arbeit mit dem eingeschneiten Stuhl denken, die Du bei der Ausstellung „Every so Often“ 2010 bei DREI in Köln gezeigt hast. Dort, wie auch bei den meisten anderen deiner Bilder, fehlen immer Menschen. Wieso eigentlich?
Anna: Früher, besonders als ich Nan Goldin für mich entdeckt habe, waren ganz viele Menschen in meinen Bildern. Immer nur solche, die mir nahe stehen. Irgendwann haben sich die Gesichter dann abgewendet, man hat zum Beispiel nur noch den Nacken gesehen. Und jetzt sind fast gar keine Menschen mehr auf den Fotos. Ich weiß gar nicht so genau wie das passiert ist. Manche Fotos, wie zum Beispiel „Eifler Feld und Wiesen“, lassen jetzt den Geschichten der Betrachter Platz und ich freue mich, wenn sie individuelle Sehnsüchte aktivieren können.

Anna-Lena: Das ist eine deiner wenigen Arbeiten, die einen deutschen und nicht einen englischen Titel haben. Wie entstehen die Titel, wie etwa von der Installation ,Farewell‘, die ein bisschen an einen Wäscheständer erinnert?
Anna: Der Titel ,Farewell‘ entstand durch den Song ,Farewell Transmission‘ von Songs: Ohia. Das habe ich rauf und runter gehört und es passte so perfekt zu der Installation mit den hängenden Tüchern, für die ich damals noch keinen passenden Titel hatte. Ich hab oft  Textzeilen im Kopf - wie zum Beispiel von Patti Smith. Mit der habe ich aber vielleicht auch einen Schaden, weil meine Mutter der größte Fan ist und wir ein Foto von ihr an der Wand hängen hatten. Als Kind hab ich deshalb immer gedacht Patti Smith gehört zu unserer Familie. Aber ich hab Kurt Cubain auch für meinen Onkel gehalten.

Anna-Lena: Wenn Lyrics für Dich so wichtig sind, was hörst Du denn momentan für Musik zum Arbeiten?
Anna: Oh, das ist ein ganz wilder Mix aus altem Hip Hop, wie Mobb Deep oder Wu Tang Clan, viel zeitlose Sachen wie Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Pj Harvey und so. Ich bin ein Fan von gut produziertem Pop. Auch Techno, besonders von Dj Koze oder klassische Musik, zum Beispiel von Bach und Chopin, finde ich fantastisch. 

Anna-Lena: Was ist dein Lieblingsort in Berlin?
Anna: In Berlin gibt es für mich je nach Jahreszeit Lieblingsplätze. An Sommerabenden liebe ich die Oranienstrasse in Kreuzberg.

Interview & Photos: Anna-Lena Werner
Photos of  Anna Virnich's artworks: Courtesy & Copyright Anna Virnich  

Am Wochenende der Düsseldorf Cologne Open Galleries (DCOpen) vom 6.-9. September 2012 eröffnen gleich drei Ausstellungen, in denen Anna Virnichs Werke zu sehen sind.

ruby_woo_anna Virnich

,RUBY WOO‘ 
Anna Virnich
OPENING: FRI, 7/9/12, 18H
until 20. October 2012

DREI
Albertusstr. 3
D-50667 Cologne

-------------------------------------------------------------

,CURIOSITY‘
Anna Virnich & Özlem Sakalsiz
OPENING & PARTY: FRI, 7. September, 24h
until 8. November 2012

Salon Schmitz 
Aachener Str. 128
50670 Cologne

-------------------------------------------------------------

,KÖPPELS & PÜRLATIONS‘ 
Artists of gallery DREI & Guests
OPENING: Thursday, 6. September, 19h
until 21. October 2012

Sammlung Philara (UG) 
Walzwerkstr. 14
D-40599 Düsseldorf
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...