26 June 2018

INTERVIEW: PEDRO GÓMEZ-EGAÑA

Artfridge_Pedro_Gomes_Egana4 Pedro Gómez-Egaña © "The Chariot of Greenwich" (2013)

The work of Columbian-born artist Pedro Gómez-Egaña's poses questions to how technologies affect societies, both historically and now. He explores collective experiences of time and how digital culture changes our attention to life. After having studied at Goldsmiths College and the Bergen National Academy of Arts, the artist lives in Denmark and Norway, where he is currently professor and researcher at the Faculty of Arts of Bergen University. His performative installation “Domain of Things” was one of the outstanding pieces presented at the 15th Istanbul Biennial in late 2017, exploring societies' rising comfort in pleasures of technology while, happening simultaneously, rising conditions of crisis causing people too escape. Currently on display in Berlin, Egaña’s  challenging exhibition "The Common Ancestor" at Zilberman Gallery addresses no less than the relation of time and power, and the mechanisation of the world.

6 June 2018

INTERVIEW: HEINER FRANZEN

Heiner Franzen | Schaukel | 2-Kanal-Videoloop | 2009 -2016 | Ausstellung Großes Gesichtsfeld | Haus am Lützowplatz | Photography ©Jan Windszus_1jpg
© Heiner Franzen "Schaukel" (2009 -2016), "Großes Gesichtsfeld" at Haus am Lützowplatz; Photography ©Jan Windszus

"Großes Gesichtsfeld" at Haus am Lützowplatz is Heiner Franzen's first institutional exhibition in Berlin. This is not only reason to celebrate. It is long overdue. And it is outstanding. Franzen, a multi-disciplinary artist who is based in Berlin and has been a visiting professor in art academies in Braunschweig and Berlin Weißensee, expresses a quiet, but an explicit voice and vision with his work. Despite his expertise, he curiously explores image culture and the way he perceives these images. With his current exhibition, thus, he attempts no less than to trace how imagination exists in our minds. 

24 April 2018

INTERVIEW: ALONA RODEH

3.Curves_of_Jaffa Installation view The curves of Jaffa, 2017; Photo: Alona Rodeh, Commissioned by Tel Aviv Municipality Arts Department 

The screaming sound of a siren transforms into a beating sound of deep techno, light is flickering, we are underground, maybe in a club, maybe in a train, some men are staring into our eyes, a fire fighter shows his muscles, his clothes are reflecting in the light, almost blinding our sight. The curtain closes, the scene is over, the sudden absence of techno beats leaves us only with the bright architecture of the space that we know so well by night and so little by day. – Welcome to the aesthetic universe of Israeli and Berlin-based artist Alona Rodeh, who knows better than anyone how to to play the acoustic and visual keyboard of safety.  

19 March 2018

DAVID OSTROWSKI & MICHAIL PIRGELIS

01-David-Ostrowski-Michail-Pirgelis-Nothing-Happened-Buchhandlung-Walther-Koenig
David Ostrowski & Michail Pirgelis, Nothing Happened, Buchhandlung Walther König, 2016

The artists David Ostrowski and Michail Pirgelis met 2003 while studying at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf and became close friends. Both based in Cologne, they have exhibited together several times, jointly initiated the MD Bar in Cologne and are each other's most honest critics. On the occasion of their exhibition "To Lose" at Leopold-Hoesch-Museum, Düren in 2016, they transcribed an intimate conversation about their friendship, their art, their obsessions and their dreams. We're happy to be publishing this dialogue on artfridge [only available in german].

3 March 2018

INTERVIEW: IŞIL EĞRIKAVUK

1-IsilEgrikavuk Işıl Eğrikavuk "Vilem Flusser and I," portrait, Berlin, 2018


Mine Kaplangı: Işıl, you are an artist, writer, researcher, scholar and – perhaps the core of all other aspects – a community builder.  Most of your works underline the importance of collective production as creating an opportunity for artists from many different fields to work together. Considering this side of your art practice what do you think about today's concepts like “art”, “artist” and “artwork” among the fields of your interests and research? Do you think that future will blur the boundaries between those terms and concepts?

31 January 2018

INTERVIEW: INA NEDDERMEYER & DOMINIK BUSCH

Salome Asega & Reese Donohue & Tongkwai Lulin, ASM(V)R, 2017, VR still © and courtesy the artists_4 "ASM(V)R", 2017 © Salome Asega & Reese Donohue & Tongkwai Lulin, courtesy the artists

Exploring the relationship between Virtual Reality and contemporary art, the exhibition “Beautiful New Worlds” at the Zeppelin Museum presents 11 artistic positions and their handling of the digital medium, including Forensic Architecture, Harun Farocki and Halil Altindere. Curated by Ina Neddermeyer and curatorial assistant Dominik Busch, it emphasises both the advantages and the critical downsides of VR-technique's potential – exploring the consequences it might cause in our future lives, in our notion of reality and in the production and perception of art. It addresses different formats of narration and the effects VR-techniques might have on the socio-political dimension and its reflection. Set in the green surroundings of Friedrichshafen in the south of Germany, right at the shores of Lake Constance, the exhibition could hardly cause more contradiction to its harmonious geographical setting. In our interview the curators Ina and Dominik explained what led them to initiate this exhibition and why they think this subject is currently so relevant.

17 January 2018

INTERVIEW: SANNA MOORE

© Indrė Šerpytytė Courtesy Parafin, London© Indrė Šerpytytė "03" from the series 150mph (2015)

Sanna Moore, curator for contemporary art at the Imperial War Museum in London, on the exhibition "Age of Terror: Art after 9/11", on strategies of representing war and terror through art, and on how contemporary art fits into the structures of a war museum.


20 December 2017

INTERVIEW: REBECCA WILSON

Samsung The Frame Lifestyle (4)_featured on artfridge
all images © Samsung / The Frame
– In  cooperation with Samsung –

Anna-Lena Werner: Rebecca, your career took you from acting as publishing director of Weidenfeld & Nicolson, working as an editor for Art Review and Modern Painters to joining Saatchi Gallery as director. Since 2013 you act as chief curator and directory of the Art Advisory of Saatchi Art. Having experienced the world of contemporary art from so many different angles, can you put words on how your different positions changed the way you look at art?

Rebecca Wilson: As you say, I started out my career in book publishing working closely with writers for 10 years. I then shifted to editing art magazines before moving into the gallery world, first of all the brick and mortar Saatchi Gallery in London and now online with Saatchi Art based in Los Angeles. I have always welcomed change and looked for new challenges. I’m also very motivated by helping creative people find the recognition they deserve and feel strongly that the traditional art world has failed many talented artists. Whether an artist is taken on by a gallery or not is fairly arbitrary and is certainly not a reflection of the quality of the work being made. At Saatchi Art we are trying to fill this huge gap by giving artists all over the world the opportunity to show their work to an international audience online. We are also helping people who love art to discover many fantastic artists they wouldn’t otherwise find. In the last 6 months we have sold works to people in over 80 countries by artists in 100 countries. I think my background and openness to doing things differently has made me more flexible in my approach to running an art gallery and re-thinking how the art world can really best help artists to have sustainable careers and make a living.